Introducing Dance in Christian Worship

Introducing Dance in Christian Worship

Dance has been a part of praise and worship to God since ancient times. It was a formal part of Christian service and liturgy until the 12th century A.D. when the early theologians, feeling that dancing was distracting and often too suggestive of ‘worldly ideas’ , began to route it out of holy ritual.

At this point in time we are beginning to rediscover the dance as a perfectly natural medium of worship, seeing it reintroduced into Christian liturgy in many churches.

If you would like to see dance incorporporated as a form of worship in your church community, Expressions Unlimited, would like to work with you toward that goal. We offer several basic programs, each of which can be tailored to meet the needs and desires of your particular congregation.

Topics covered may include:

  • The history of dance in worship
  • What is dance?
  • What makes dance sacred or liturgical?
  • How do you form a dance ministry?
  • Dance training-pros and cons
  • Leadership qualities for dance ministers
  • Choreography – who- and how?
  • Working with/being part of the worship team
  • Choosing music
  • Integrating with your music ministry
  • When to include dance in worship
  • Educating your congregation
  • Understanding and working with polarities
  • Garments/what to wear
  • Ministry cycles- how to stay fresh and new
  • Tracking the impact of dance on your faith community

Formats:

Track A - full day 6 hour introductory workshop

Track B - two day extended workshop. This workshop covers each area of dance ministry in greater depth as well as including dance basics for those who may have no prior dance training.

Track C – combines either Track A or Track B with consultation services through one cycle of the seasons of the liturgical year.

Facilitator: Phyllis Pomerleau- Phyllis has been involved in dance ministry for over 25 years, dancing in churches of many denominations in the New England area. She facilitated and led dance ministry in her home parish for 10 years – and has worked with adults, children of all ages, as well as combined age groups. She believes that the language of the soul is most effectively interpreted in the freedom of the dance and finds great joy in guiding others into that experience.